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Prevent And Reduce COVID-19 Transmission Among Employees

Prevent And Reduce COVID-19 Transmission Among Employees

Businesses and employers can prevent and reduce the spread of COVID-19 among the employees at the workplace. Employers should respond in a way that takes into account the level of disease transmission in their communities and revise their business response plans as needed.

Monitor federal, state, and local public health communications about COVID-19 regulations, guidance, and recommendations and ensure that workers have access to that information. Frequently check the CDC COVID-19 website.

Actively Encourage Sick Employees To Stay Home

  • Employees who have symptoms should notify their supervisor and stay home.
  • Sick employees should follow the CDC-recommended steps. Employees should not return to work until the criteria to discontinue home isolation are met, in consultation with healthcare providers.
  • Employees who are well but who have a sick family member at home with COVID-19 should notify their supervisor and follow CDC recommended precautions.

Consider conducting daily in-person or virtual health checks (e.g., symptom and/or temperature screening) of employees before they enter the facility, in accordance with state and local public health authorities and, if available, your occupational health services:

  • If implementing in-person health checks, conduct them safely and respectfully. Employers may use social distancing, barrier or partition controls, or personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect the screener. 
  • Complete the health checks in a way that helps maintain social distancing guidelines, such as providing multiple screening entries into the building.
  • Follow guidance from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regarding confidentiality of medical records from health checks.
  • To prevent stigma and discrimination in the workplace, make employee health screenings as private as possible. 

Identify where and how workers might be exposed to COVID-19 at work: 

Employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthy workplace. Conduct a thorough hazard assessment of the workplace to identify potential workplace hazards related to COVID-19. 

Use appropriate combinations of controls from the hierarchy of controls to limit the spread of COVID-19, including engineering controls, workplace administrative policies, and personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect workers from the identified hazards (see table below):

  • Conduct a thorough hazard assessment to determine if workplace hazards are present, or are likely to be present, and determine what type of controls or PPE are needed for specific job duties.
  • When engineering and administrative controls cannot be implemented or are not fully protective, employers are required by OSHA standards to:
    • Determine what PPE is needed for their workers’ specific job duties,
    • Select and provide appropriate PPE to the workers at no cost, and
    • Train their workers on its correct use.
  • Encourage workers to wear a cloth face covering at work if the hazard assessment has determined that they do not require PPE, such as a respirator or medical facemask for protection.
    • CDC recommends wearing a cloth face covering as a measure to contain the wearer’s respiratory droplets and help protect their co-workers and members of the general public.
    • Cloth face coverings are not considered PPE. They may prevent workers, including those who don’t know they have the virus, from spreading it to others but may not protect the wearers from exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • Remind employees and customers that CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. 
  • Wearing a cloth face covering, however, does not replace the need to practice social distancing.
  • See the OSHA COVID-19 webpage for more information on how to protect workers from potential COVID-19 exposures and guidance for employers, including steps to take for jobs according to exposure risk.

Separate sick employees:

  • Employees who appear to have symptoms upon arrival at work or who become sick during the day should immediately be separated from other employees, customers, and visitors, and sent home.
  • Have a procedure in place for the safe transport of an employee who becomes sick while at work. The employee may need to be transported home or to a healthcare provider.

Take action if an employee is suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19:

In most cases, you do not need to shut down your facility. If it has been less than 7 days since the sick employee has been in the facility, close off any areas used for prolonged periods of time by the sick person:

  • Wait 24 hours before cleaning and disinfecting to minimize the potential for other employees being exposed to respiratory droplets. If waiting 24 hours is not feasible, wait as long as possible.
  • During this waiting period, open outside doors and windows to increase air circulation in these areas.

If it has been 7 days or more since the sick employee used the facility, additional cleaning and disinfection is not necessary. Continue routinely cleaning and disinfecting all high-touch surfaces in the facility.

Follow the CDC cleaning and disinfection recommendations:

  • Clean dirty surfaces with soap and water before disinfecting them.
  • To disinfect surfaces, use products that meet EPA criteria for use against SARS-Cov-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and is appropriate for the surface.
  • Always wear gloves and gowns appropriate for the chemicals being used when you are cleaning and disinfecting.
  • You may need to wear additional PPE depending on the setting and disinfectant product you are using. For each product you use, consult and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use.

Determine which employees may have been exposed to the virus and may need to take additional precautions:

  • Inform employees of their possible exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace but maintain confidentiality as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
  • Most workplaces should follow the Public Health Recommendations for Community-Related Exposure and instruct potentially exposed employees to stay home for 14 days, telework if possible, and self-monitor for symptoms.
  • Critical infrastructure workplaces should follow the guidance on Implementing Safety Practices for Critical Infrastructure Workers Who May Have Had Exposure to a Person with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19. 
  • Employers in critical infrastructure also have an obligation to manage potentially exposed workers’ return to work in ways that best protect the health of those workers, their co-workers, and the general public.

Educate employees about steps they can take to protect themselves at work and at home:

  • Encourage employees to follow any new policies or procedures related to illness, cleaning and disinfecting, and work meetings and travel.
  • Advise employees to:
  • Stay home if they are sick, except to get medical care, and to learn what to do if they are sick.
  • Inform their supervisor if they have a sick family member at home with COVID-19 and to learn what to do if someone in their home is sick.
  • Wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or to use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available. 
  • Inform employees that if their hands are visibly dirty, they should use soap and water over hand sanitizer. Key times for employees to clean their hands include:
    • Before and after work shifts
    • Before and after work breaks
    • After blowing their nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After using the restroom
    • Before eating or preparing food
    • After putting on, touching, or removing cloth face coverings
  • Avoid touching their eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover their mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, or use the inside of their elbow. 
  • Throw used tissues into no-touch trash cans and immediately wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. 
  • If soap and water are not available, use hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol. 
  • Practice routine cleaning and disinfection of frequently touched objects and surfaces such as workstations, keyboards, telephones, handrails, and doorknobs. Dirty surfaces can be cleaned with soap and water prior to disinfection. 
  • Avoid using other employees’ phones, desks, offices, or other work tools and equipment, when possible. Clean and disinfect them before and after use.
  • Practice social distancing by avoiding large gatherings and maintaining distance (at least 6 feet) from others when possible.

For employees who commute to work using public transportation or ride sharing, consider offering the following support:

  • Offer employees incentives to use forms of transportation that minimize close contact with others, such as offering reimbursement for parking or single-occupancy ride shares.
  • Allow employees to shift their hours so they can commute during less busy times.
  •  Ask employees to clean their hands as soon as possible after their trip.

How Does Businesses Overcome COVID-19 Challenges?

For many businesses, they have had to adapt and overcome by changing the way they conduct business.

 A visitor management system can help any business meet these safety requirements and more. With a visitor management system the company can create a customized check-in process that reflects your company’s policies and include steps that help prevent the spread of the virus.

Fidentity Visitor Management System

Fidentity also offers a facial recognition system that stores over 100,000 images ensuring that all employees and visitors information will be saved without incident. 

Fidentity also offers a facial recognition system that stores over 100,000 images ensuring that all employees and visitors information will be saved without incident. 

The same facial recognition system also offers temperature scans of employees and visitors. 

This helps to ensure that no one enters the building that is running a fever and risks transmitting Covid-19 to their employees.

Fidentity will also allow businesses to create a touchless visitor check-in process by pre-registering visitors and sending out a QR code to smart phones that the kiosk reads. 

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